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KS5
Biology
Unit 1
Structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins;
Enzyme action
Structure and properties of cell membranes; passive and active transport
Structure and role of DNA and RNA
Replication; protein synthesis
Monohybrid inheritance
Gene mutations
Principles of gene therapy; social and ethical issues.
Unit 2
Cell structure and ultrastructure of eukaryote and prokaryote cells: cell specialisation
The role of meiosis
Genotype and environmental influence
Stem cell research and its implications
Biodiversity, adaptations and natural selection
Principles of taxonomy
Plant cell structure
Transport of water in plants
Uses of plant products
Unit 3
Students write a report of between 1500 and 2000 words on any area of biological interest.
Students’ practical skills will be assessed by the teacher against criteria provided in the specification.
Unit 4
Photosynthesis
Energy transfer within ecosystems
Evidence for global warming
Evolution through natural selection and speciation
Nutrient recycling
DNA profiling and PCR
Structure of bacteria and viruses
Infectious diseases (e.g. AIDS and TB) and immunology.
Unit 5
ATP, glycolysis, anaerobic/aerobic respiration
Control and functioning of heart
Ventilation and cardiac output
Homeostasis
The nervous system
Impact of exercise on body, and improving performance
Hormonal coordination
Brain structure and development
Imbalances in brain chemicals
Human Genome Project.
Unit 6
In the July of Year 12 A-level Biologists undertake a field trip to Juniper Hall, Surrey. Whilst there, students plan and carry out field work. On return to school in September students write up their findings. The trip has been running for 5 years and continues to be a huge success year on year. 
 
Chemistry 
Unit 1
This unit provides opportunities for students to develop the basic chemical skills of formulae writing, equation writing and calculating chemical quantities. The study of energetics in chemistry is of theoretical and practical importance. In this unit students learn to define measure and calculate enthalpy changes. They will see how a study of enthalpy changes can help chemists to understand chemical bonding. The study of atomic structure introduces s, p, and d orbitals and shows how a more detailed understanding of electron configurations can account for the arrangement of elements in the periodic table. The unit introduces the three types of strong chemical bonding (ionic, covalent and metallic). Organic chemistry is also introduced with students studying alkanes and alkenes.
Unit 2
This unit develops the treatment of chemical bonding by introducing intermediate types of bonding and by exploring the nature and effects of intermolecular forces. Study of the periodic table is extended to cover the chemistry of groups 2 and 7. Ideas about redox reactions are applied, in particular, to the reactions of halogens and their compounds. The unit develops a largely qualitative understanding of the ways in which chemists can control the rate, direction and extent of chemical change. Organic chemistry in this unit covers alcohols and halogenoalkanes. The treatment is extended to explore the mechanisms of selected examples. Students have to use formulae and balance equations and have an understanding of chemical quantities. Aspects of green chemistry and climate change are also studied.
Unit 3
This unit contains practical assessments that cover the content of Units 1 and 2. The practical assessments cover the areas of physical, organic and inorganic chemistry. The types of practicals that students must complete are qualitative observations, quantitative measurements and preparations.
Unit 4
In this unit students make a quantitative study of chemical kinetics and take further their study of organic reaction mechanisms. The topics of entropy and equilibria show how chemists are able to predict quantitatively the direction and extent of chemical change. The organic chemistry in this unit covers carbonyl compounds, plus carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Students are required to apply their knowledge gained in Units 1 and 2 to all aspects of this unit. This includes nomenclature, ideas of isomerism, bond polarity and bond enthalpy, reagents and reaction conditions, reaction types and mechanisms. Students are also expected to use formulae and balance equations and calculate chemical quantities.
Unit 5
In this unit the study of electrode potentials builds on the study of redox in Unit 2, including the concept of oxidation number and the use of redox half equations. Students will study further chemistry related to redox and transition metals. The further organic chemistry section of this unit focuses on arenes and organic nitrogen compounds such as amines, amides, amino acids and proteins. Students are expected to use the knowledge and understanding of organic chemistry that they have gained over the whole GCE in Chemistry when covering the organic synthesis section. This unit draws on all other units within the GCE in Chemistry and students are expected to use their prior knowledge when learning about these areas. Students will again encounter ideas of isomerism, bond polarity and bond enthalpy, reagents and reaction conditions, reaction types and mechanisms. Students are also expected to use formulae and balance equations and calculate chemical quantities.
Unit 6
This unit contains practical assessments that cover the content of Units 4 and 5. The practical assessments cover the areas of physical, organic and inorganic chemistry. The types of practicals that students must complete are qualitative observations, quantitative measurements and preparations. There is the opportunity for students to undertake a multi-stage experiment, which includes the quantitative measurement and preparation in a longer assessment.
Physics
Unit 1
This unit involves the study of mechanics (rectilinear motion, forces, energy and power) and materials (flow of liquids, viscosity, Stokes’ Law, properties of materials, Young’s’ modulus and elastic strain energy). Part of this topic may be taught using applications that relate to, for example, sports. The other part of this topic may be taught using, for example, a case study of the production of sweets and biscuits. It may also be taught using the physics associated with spare part surgery for joint replacements and lens implants.
Unit 2
This unit involves the study of waves (including refraction, polarisation, diffraction and standing (stationary) waves), electricity (current and resistance, Ohm’s law and nonohmic materials, potential dividers, emf and internal resistance of cells, and negative temperature coefficient thermistors) and the wave/particle nature of light. Several different contexts may be used to teach parts of this unit including music, medical physics, technology in space, solar cells and an historical study of the nature of light.
Unit 3
This unit involves an experiment that is based on a case study of an application of physics. Students work to independently gather data and write up their investigation. 
Unit 4
This unit involves the study of further mechanics (momentum and circular motion), electric and magnetic fields, and particle physics. Several different contexts may be used to teach parts of this unit including a modern rail transport system, communications and display techniques. Particle physics is the subject of current research, involving the acceleration and detection of high-energy particles. This area of the specification may be taught by exploring a range of contemporary experiments.
Unit 5
This unit involves the study of thermal energy, nuclear decay, oscillations, astrophysics and cosmology.
Several different contexts may be used to teach parts of this unit including space technology, medical physics and the construction of buildings in earthquake zones. The astrophysics and cosmology section of this specification may be taught using the physical interpretation of astronomical observations, the formation and evolution of stars, and the history and future of the universe.
Unit 6 
This unit involves planning and carrying out an experiment and analysing experimental results. Students complete this Unit independently with support from the teacher. 

Key Stage 5 Science: A-Level Biology, Chemistry and Physics

At KS5 in Years 12 and 13, students can study both AS Level and A-Level Biology, Chemistry and Physics.  All our A-Level courses are run by experienced A-Level teachers who are subject specialists and the results of August 2016 continue the trend of improvement, with the best examination results to date (see tables below).  This year a large proportion of our A-Level scientists went on to study science at Russell Group universities such as:

  • Viseradi Beqaraj (Geophysics at University College London)
  • Monika Gill (Biomedical Science at King's College, London)
  • Natasha Mahatantila (Chemistry at Warwick)
  • Mary Malla (Chemical Engineering at Sheffield)
  • Theresa Pillay (Pharmacy at Durham)
  • Leila Hannoun (Radiotherapy at Cardiff)
  • Alexandra Sanyaolu (Medicine at King's College, London)
Apart from first rate teaching and learning, Year 12 and Year 13 class sizes are small which leads to more personalised learning and individual attention, and there is a weekly drop in session for each science discipline which allows students an even greater level of support as it is required.  At the start of each year all science students benefit from a series of induction lessons to focus and up-skill them for their studies ahead.  All students receive a textbook and a course handbook which outlines the course and includes a personalised learning checklist to aid learning as well as an in-house exam technique guide designed using the wealth of experience within the department.  This is a progressive department where we aim to nurture independent learners ready for the challenges of university and work, therefore in addition to teachers tracking progress, students are expected to take ownership of their study through the use of their MYPLC App and Google Drive.  The 2016 results at KS5 are as follows:
Grade (2016) Biology A2 (%) Biology AS (%)
A*-A 40 39
A*-B 71 50
A*-C 94 83
A*-E 100 100
Grade (2016) Chemistry A2 (%) Chemistry AS (%)
A*-A 0 22
A*-B 58 39
A*-C 75 67
A*-E 100 100
Grade (2016) Physics A2 (%) Physics AS (%)
A*-A 18 12.5
A*-B 28 62.5
A*-C 100 87.5
A*-E 100 100

 

Alexandra Sanyaolu on A-Level Results Day with her A grade in A-Level Biology and B grade in A-Level Chemistry, pictured with Headteacher Mr Desa who retired this summer.  Alexandra is now studying Medicine at King's College, London.

 

Head Boy Callum Onyenaobiya with his A grade in A-Level Physics.

 

Lauren Hosannah with her A grade in A-Level Biology.

 

KS5 Programmes of Study 

Year 12 (AS and the first year of the 2 year A-Level course)

  Term 1 December 2016 Term 2 December 2017 Term 3
Biology Unit 1 Unit 1 mock exam (no public examination) Unit 2 Unit 1 and 2 mock examinations

Revision

Unit 1 and 2 examinations

Chemistry Unit 1 Unit 1 mock exam (no public examination) Unit 2 Unit 1 and 2 mock examinations

Revision

Unit 1 and 2 examinations

Physics Unit 1 Unit 1 mock exam (no public examination) Unit 2 Unit 1 and 2 mock examinations

Revision

Unit 1 and 2 examinations

 

Year 13 (second year of 2 year A-Level course)

  Term 1 December 2016 Term 2 December 2017 Term 3
Biology Unit 4 Paper 1 mock exam (no public examination) Unit 5 Paper 1 and 2 mock examinations

Revision

Unit 1 and 2 examinations

Chemistry Unit 4 Paper 1 mock exam (no public examination) Unit 5 Paper 1 and 2 mock examinations

Revision

Unit 1 and 2 examinations

Physics  Unit 4 Paper 1 mock exam (no public examination) Unit 5 Paper 1 and 2 mock examinations

Revision

Unit 1 and 2 examinations

Please click here for a detailed outline of the Biology, Chemistry and Physics AS and A-Level curriculum.